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Why you should make a will

The laws of the land in the UK, as set out in The Administration of Estates Act 1925, state, for example:

If your estate is worth more than £5,000 and you have not made a will, then your estate will be distributed under the intestacy laws.

If you are single and living with someone, your partner will not automatically inherit anything when you die unless you make a will.

If you are married with no children, and you die without making a will, then your spouse will get the first £200,000 and personal chattels plus half the balance of your estate. The remainder will pass to your parents. If they have both died, it will pass to your brothers and sisters. If you do not have any, then all of your estate will pass to your surviving spouse – property in joint names may pass to the survivor.

If you are married with children, and die without making a will, then your spouse will get the first £125,000 and personal chattels plus the interest only from half of the remaining estate. The other half of the estate will go to the children immediately, along with the first half when your spouse dies.

THERE ARE ONLY TWO WAYS YOU CAN CHANGE THIS:

 1. Alter the laws of the land
 2. Write a will setting out your wishes

The first, of course is not within your hands. The second, however, can be done easily and without great expense.


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